A History of Wh**e Supremacy: Ida B. Wells Did NOT Coin The Phrase “Wh**e Supremacy”

We saw on Twitter where someone  said: “Ida B Wells may have coined the phrase “wh**e supremacy…” Real simple…real quick Ida B. Wells DID NOT coin the phrase “wh**e supremacy.” The need to legitimize Black people using a phrase that was not invented by us or for us shows the people pushing that agenda are fresh out … More A History of Wh**e Supremacy: Ida B. Wells Did NOT Coin The Phrase “Wh**e Supremacy”

On Negro Ascendancy in the West Indies by Cora Montgomery

Transcribed from The daily crescent. ([New Orleans, La.]), 20 Aug. 1850. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. This letter seems to be the first use in print of the phrase “white supremacy” in the Western Hemisphere. Cora Montgomery is the pseudonym of a woman named Jane McManus Storm Cazneau. Cazneau is credited with being the originator … More On Negro Ascendancy in the West Indies by Cora Montgomery

From the Welsing Institute

“We now are in the 21st century. Recently, there has been an unraveling and an analysis of the core issue of the first global power system of mass oppression– the power system of racism (white supremacy). Once the collective victim (non-white population) understands this fundamental issue, the ultimate organizing of all of the appropriate behaviors … More From the Welsing Institute

Keyamsha and the end of Afrophobia

Afrophobia From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Florence Kate Upton‘s Golliwogg and friends, in The Adventures of two Dutch Dolls And A Golliwogg, published in 1895. Fashioned after a minstrel doll and described as “a horrid sight, the blackest gnome,” he was the introduction to black people for many children. Afrophobia is a phobic attitude toward … More Keyamsha and the end of Afrophobia